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Friday, 18 November 2011

VFS Illustrator Andy Bumpus at Vogue.Com

You will recognize his work by his faceless illustration with the only appearance of his signature tiny sexy red lips.

Andy Bumpus, our Fashion Week illustrator extraordinaire, just published his illustration from SS12 Fashion Week at Vogue.com, including some of his illustration from Vauxhall Fashion Scout shows.

Have a look to all of them here.





VFS Mentoring Event Review- Production


Guest speakers;


Burack Cakmak: Head of Sustainable Production, Gucci Group Ltd.
With over thirteen years business experience, Burack is currently the Director of Corporate Sustainability at Gucci Group. He is responsible for the implementation of sustainable production, working to develop initiatives for business ethics, human rights and environmental stewardship.

Paul Williams: Business Counsellor for East London Small Business Centre
With an extensive history in garment manufacturing, Paul became Managing Director for the design and manufacturing of Next, Debenhams and House of Fraser, running three factories simultaneously. Paul then spent two years as a consultant, auditing and setting up factories in China and Turkey for various clients before becoming an advisor at ELSBC. ELSBC is an agency designed to provide financial and business advice and support to start up fashion labels in the UK. 

Burhan Bilici: Managing Director De´ Atelier Ltd/Sourgrape
With a family background in manufacturing, Burhan has 15 years experience in the production business, having worked for companies including Karen Millen, Whistles and All Saints. Burack now runs his own production company with a portfolio that includes Hussein Chalayan, Erdem, Peter Pilotto, Jonathan Saunders, Mary Katrantzou, Roksanda Ilincic, Richard Nicoll, Roland Mouret, Eudon Choi & House of Holland.

Finding the right factory
  • You can start on-line with a basic search and email the ones you are interested in 
  • Go to an area where there are many factories and visit them all until you find the right one
  • Talk to others and share your experiences. You must all work together as the next generation of designers. You do not have to share confidential information but working together will give you more leverage to influence behaviour.
  • Look at other brands the factories work for. Are these brands in-line with yours?
  • When they have made your sample, this should be an indicator of the quality of your production orders.

Manufacturing Abroad
  • Don't have to go abroad for manufacturing. More and more units are opening up in the UK - not just in London but also in the Midlands and North of England
  • When you are starting out, it is a good idea to have things manufactured in the UK because you can keep a close eye on it. It's when the orders grow and you need to start considering price that you might consider manufacturing abroad
  • It completely depends on your designs where you might choose to go. You might consider Italy, Portugal, Turkey, The Eastern Block (in particular Bulgaria and Lithuania) or you may have to go even further if you need specific skills e.g. handwork to India or Morocco for leather
  • You don't have to stick to one location. As you grow, you may consider different location

'Made in Britain' label
  • Items can be labelled, 'Made in Britain' if a certain percentage of the garment was made in Britain
  • If you buy fabric and bring it into EU and pay the duty, it becomes European
  • You don't have to put country of origin on garment labels within the EU, however, this is a requirement for the US

Custom Information
  • You can ring them and find out, they are very helpful

UK Based Production
  • There is a big market for UK production, not just new designers but also bigger designers
  • Designers like the 'Made in Britain' label
  • More retailers would like to come to the UK to reduce the carbon footprint
  • There isn't enough manufacturing in the UK to be able to cater for the demand but more manufacturers are now starting to think its worth it to open up small factories

Questions to ask a factory initially 
  • The capacity of the factory
  • What their availability is
  • When their quiet periods are - when it will be best time to place your orders
  • What interests them in taking on your goods
  • Their lead times
  • Prices - they should have set prices
  • Terms of Business - set these out in the beginning. Ask questions like, "What if you are late with production?". Cover all possible situations so you know where you stand if problems arise.
  • Ask what their sample mark-up rate is

The Factory/Designer Relationship
  • A factory is only as good as its designers
  • Make sure you go there with absolutely all the information you need. It has to be very clear. Organisation is key
  • Have the sample with you, technical drawings, size charts, information on how to make, patterns. You have to make sure your patterns are correct
  • Any inaccuracy will hinder your production. You need to make sure all elements are covered early on 
  • You've worked on the sample and should know where the complications lie so if you know something might be tricky in production, make them aware
  • Make sure they can understand your handwriting
  • If you need to supply threading, beads, zips, they all have to be there. If anything is missing, it will stop production
  • If your factory is abroad, you have to be even more careful that everything is there. Have a line sheet and triple-check everything
  • Everything has to be available at the same time. Once the factory cuts the garment, they will want to finish it. They have targets to reach themselves. If you have things missing, the relationship breaks down

Production Orders and Samples
  • Factories do samples for the shows so they are familiar with the product and can give designers a price for production
  • Sampling costs a lot more than production does. There are separate prices for samples and orders
  • Don't just turn up with a sample and ask how much it would be to produce
  • You should see the factory's ability to create a high quality garment before placing a full order
  • It's unrealistic to ask a factory to sample every item in a collection

Overseeing Production
  • Go in while they are making your products especially when they are on the machines
  • You know the product better than anyone else so you should physically be there overseeing that
  • All factories should allow this
  • You can give them comment sheets on what you expect
  • You can oversee from samples to full orders

Pricing
  • Garment must be made in a cost-effective way
  • Without changing the design, you can look at how it's made
  • Ask the factory for advice on ways to reduce the costs
  • It is the style which will determine pricing - some styles are just not productive
  • After 50 pieces, you should be able to ask for a discount in the UK
  • Abroad, it might be over a 1000

Cutting
  • Factories prefer to cut themselves
  • If you cut it or you've outsourced the cutting and something goes wrong at the factory stage, easy for them to blame it on the cut

What to do if your sample was perfect but your production order wasn't
  • If you were there while it was being made, you could avoid this
  • Shouldn't be any different if they made sample perfectly
  • Tell them it's not how you wanted it. You will then have to negotiate
  • It is very difficult to try and get anything back if they do get it wrong
  • Avoid mistakes by regular visits and building relationships

Terms of Agreement
  • Some factories won't sign contracts, depends on the establishment but you can have terms of agreement
  • Terms of Agreement can be through e-mail provided you get a response
  • As an incentive, you could offer to pay an extra percentage if they finish your order early

Payment Terms
  • You can have stipulations in your terms of agreement that will give terms of payment
  • Each factory has their own payment terms and you will have to negotiate these
  • You should aim to be able to QC your garments first without handing over any money in the UK. This is more difficult when manufacturing abroad - you will have to pay 30-40% upfront. You can then QC the garments before handing the rest over
  • It is important to pay something to be ethical/sustainable and cover some of the factory's costs such as wages

Production Loans from 
  • Available from East London Small Business Centre
  • If you get an order from a reputable stockist, you can apply for a loan. If approved, they will fund fabric and production costs until you get paid
  • This is usually over a 3-4 month period with interest at 5%-7%
  • If you've paid this back on time, there is the option of coming back the following season for another loan

Minimum and Maximum Orders
  • In the UK, 10-20 garments, Europe 50-100 garments, China 250 garments
  • Minimums are coming down in Europe
  • Items that require handwork are lower
  • If it is less than 10, sample prices will be charged
  • With samples, possible to get just one done only if you book in advance

Re-orders
  • Factories like to forecast 3-4 months ahead but book out 80-90% of capacity with 10% left to cater for additional work and re-orders
  • Only small re-orders

Timing
  • Build yourself a critical path and follow it
  • You are a business so keep in touch with the factory and oversee the production to make sure it is being done on time
  • Factory will be eager to meet deadlines because they have factored in other production also

Sustainable Production
  • Looking at the impact you are having when creating a product and be considerate every step of the way. Make sure you are not putting future generations needs in jepordy. You have to be considerate of how much you are using, what type of materials you are using 
  • Put in your Terms of Agreement that you expect minimum wage to be paid and standards to be followed
  • Find out who exactly is making your product so everything is traceable
  • Consider how much processing goes into the design, where you are producing, where you transport from
  • Consider using local services to help sustain and create jobs

Production Agents
  • These aren't a good idea when starting out
  • Bigger companies use them especially when manufacturing abroad
  • They will impact on your cash
  • You should learn to do things yourself so you experience everything from design up to sales
Sarah Goodwin

Fashion’s Music Night In


Notting Hill’s own little Aladdin’s cave, Village Bicycle, collaborated with Parisian brand Paris Eleven to host an exclusive event last week. Promoting Eleven Paris’s limited addition Joy Division T-shirt; paying a homage to the bands vast contribution to music over the years. This event was an ethical promotion as all proceeds of these limited men’s designs go to MDF, the Bipolar Organisation.
The party scene was set in Village Bicycles treasure trove of a shop, surrounded by trinkets and innovative, emerging designer brands such as Aishesh, Devastee and of course Eleven Paris.



Village Bicycle first opened its doors earlier this year, located opposite Matches in Notting Hill. The shop is a concept store created by London socialite and heiress Willa Keswick. Inspired by the iconic Sixties Chelsea store ‘Granny Takes a Trip’ and her travels around the globe; this bespoke boutique is not something you see every day.  With huge neon crosses, religious iconic projections and day of the dead memorabilia, this place is a visual feast!



The Party kicked off with Four Roses Bourbon whisky sours served in cute little jam jars, aptly named ‘She’s lost control’. We listened to American record producer (known for working with Joy Division) Arthur Bakers' choice of tracks followed with a set from model and ‘It girl’, Mary Charteis. 
The rock and roll glitterati were of course in attendance for this special night, we spotted a couple of The Rolling Stone’s offspring, Tyrone Wood and Jade Jagger along with Super-Model Jade Parfit and the Hurts’ Theo Hutchcraft! After all that excitement we went outside to be greeted with what I can only describe as the tastiest hotdog I have ever eaten, provided by Old Street's foodie sensations ‘Big Apple Hot Dogs, amusingly named huge pole hotdogs.




With Village Bicycle’s unique and exciting retail treasure trove and prog-rock royalty t-shirts going to a worthy cause, I definitely recommend a visit.


Beth Gallagher

Wednesday, 16 November 2011

Asger Juel Larsen- an Inspiration



We at Vauxhall Fashion Scout are renowned for finding and nurturing the next generation in talent. Some of our designers have gained such great followings and received numerous awards, it's no wonder that a lot of them have the power to inspire and intrigue. Charlotte Summers, one of our contributors is so inspired by one, she has used their innovative vision and aspirations to produce some amazing photography and styling work.
Ones to Watch MEN.
"Unique is definitely a word Asger Juel Larsen will be used to hearing. You only need to Google his name and I can guarantee almost 100% of reviews, blogs and interviews on there will all state a similar opinion. Without hesitations I completely agree of course, however not only do his garments deserve attention, as a designer, he is incredibly inspiring and creative beyond some of the greats. 
Graduating from London College of Fashion in 2009 with a BA Menswear degree, the Danish designer has an extensive and powerful imagination which can be seen throughout each of his collections. From his d├ębut SS10 focusing on themes of Medieval warfare to his latest SS12 contrast in which he is “encouraging people to explore through their clothes and pick up inspiration on their way”, you can see his aura within the Menswear industry becoming iconic. He also won the Vauxhall Fashion Scout's prestigious Ones to Watch MEN award in Februrary 2011.
His fascination and passion for historical events, characters and eras are depicted through detailing, layering and the structure of the outfits. Twisted together with an air of modern, if not a slightly futuristic edge, shows his versatility that is almost a must to stand out these days. 
Feeling creative and truly inspired by all of his work, I put my fashion styling and photography into practice to see if I could achieve the same emotion and attitude using a female model and vintage clothes, which I customized with staple accessories he used within three of his collections. You can see the outcome in the image below. My images are to the right of some of Asger Juel Larsen's most inspiring pieces."


Charlotte Summers

SSSShhhhhhhhhh... Don't Tell Anyone- Tell Everyone!




Listen up Vauxhall Fashion Scout followers! We received an invitation to an exclusive and mysterious event and exhibition at an unknown location. Intrigued? So were we, so we thought we’d like to share the mystery, just in case anybody would like to attend/cover the event too. It sounds right up our street- does it yours? 
The night is being hosted by Anomalous Visuals who describe themselves as ‘A collective of interdisciplinary artists that combine photography, moving image, digital manipulation, graphic design, lighting, projection, installation, music and animation to produce a varied set of expressive multi-media outcomes and visual anomalies.’
There is an exhibition open to all from 9th-11th December, and an exclusive private party from 6-9pm on the 8th December. Should you wish to attend and cover the private night, you should RSVP to sarah@anomalousvisuals.co.uk
Here are the details;
Secret Subterranean Solo Show between 9th-11th December.
Below are the full event details and listing for SSSShhhhhhhhhh with the online press pack available at http://www.anomalousvisuals.co.uk/index.php?/exhibitions/sssshhhhhhhhhh/
If you are able to provide a listing and/or feature for the event we would be most appreciative. We have several virals that are currently circulating, should you wish to post these, the direct links are also provided below.
Please do feel free to contact us if you require any further information.


Full info:
Anomalous Visuals presents:
SSSShhhhhhhhhh...
A SECRET SUBTERRANEAN SOLO SHOW
9th-11th Dec 
12-8pm  Free entry
East London Location TBA 
A cavernous underground retrospective featuring a labyrinthine selection of interactive installations, unorthodox fashion photography and esoteric moving image. SSSShhhhhhhhhh is a unique and immersive show that celebrates Anomalous Visuals’ first year as an audio and visual collective.
Set within a mysterious and unlikely “gallery” space in East London, prepare for a fusion of media dedicated to collective projects that honour the inspiring creative’s who’ve helped to build the ethos behind AV.
An experience in itself, SSSShhhhhhhhhh brings together film, fashion, design, art, animation, music and motion graphics into an array of aberrant visuals from a range of recent collaborators.
A Secret Subterranean Solo Show challenges the commercial and conventional artistic ideas of an exhibition, promising a multi-sensory world of illuminated digital anomalies in an underground event to remember...
'Don't Tell Anyone, Tell Everyone'
For location disclosure visit www.anomalousvisuals.co.uk from Dec 1st
Virals:


So, take our word for it, this is going to be one event you don’t want to miss out on. Feel free to take this post an pass it on, it’s all rather exciting, isn’t it? We’ll definitely see you there!


Sarah Potter- Editor

Tuesday, 15 November 2011

Andrej Pejic and Zombie Boy for Auslander



The obsession with ‘freak chic’ has taken the modelling world by storm this year, questioning the whole concept of beauty.
Fronted by the infamous Rick Genest aka Zombie boy and the poster boy for gender neutrality Andrej Pejic. Both have found success heading extremely powerful and thought provoking campaigns for big names within the industry. Pejic has been working his ‘most beautiful boy in the world’ persona for Jean-paul Gautier and Marc Jacobs among many others. While Genest has brought Thierry Mugler back to life and featured alongside Lady Gaga in her video ‘Born this way’.


                             
                                    

These genre defying beauties have created quite a buzz with their unique looks, proving that the idea that traditional beauty is best, is not always the case.
It was only a matter of time before someone put them in the same room and Brazilian brand Auslander has done just that, pairing these extraordinary muses cum models in their S/S 12 campaign.







An intimate atmosphere transpired at the shoot as the two stood holding hands, a subtle metaphor uniting their ‘otherness’. The minimal, clean lined nature of Auslander works beautifully against such striking models. Genest’s masculine stance and defined deep set eyes makes a stark yet beautiful contrast against Pejic’s ethereal, effeminate frame and delicate features. A thought provoking  aspect of this campaign is that their ‘freakishness’ is not specifically made to be an issue.


Though Auslander doesn’t let you forget who these models are; capturing them both topless moves the campaign into a new dimension. Taking the eye away from the clothes and stripping back all the visuals, showing the two extraordinary beautiful beings that lie beneath. 

Beth Gallagher

Monday, 14 November 2011

Production Mentoring Tonight



Tonight Vauxhall Fashion Scout is launching a new series of Mentoring Events!

Running in partnership with Beach Blanket Babylon and supported by the Mayor of London, these events are free to fashion designers and feature experts from across the industry.

The new series is kicking off  tonight on the topic of Production, featuring guest speakers from Gucci GroupELSBC and DeAtelier Ltd and will feature the issues involved in taking designs to production. Covering all aspects of manufacturing, our panel of industry professionals will provide advice on sourcing the best manufacturer for your collection locally and overseas, how to optimize relationships with production units, communicating with factories, sampling, quality and sustainability control and negotiating costing, payments and delivery.

Production
Today Monday 14th November 7pm
Beach Blanket Babylon, Shoreditch

Guest speakers for the evening will include:

Burack Cakmak: Head of Sustainable Production, Gucci Group Ltd.
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With over thirteen years business experience, Burack is currently the Director of Corporate Sustainability at Gucci Group. He is responsible for the implementation of sustainable production, working to develop initiatives for business ethics, human rights and environmental stewardship.

Paul Williams: Business Counsellor for East London Small Business Centre
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With an extensive history in garment manufacturing, Paul became Managing Director for the design and manufacturing of Next, Debenhams and House of Fraser, running three factories simultaneously. Paul then spent two years as a consultant, auditing and setting up factories in China and Turkey for various clients before becoming an advisor at ELSBC. ELSBC is an agency designed to provide financial and business advice and support to start up fashion labels in the UK. 

Burhan Bilici: Managing Director De´ Atelier Ltd/Sourgrape

With a family background in manufacturing, Burhan has 15 years experience in the production business, having worked for companies including Karen Millen, Whistles and All Saints. Burack now runs his own production company with a portfolio that includes Hussein Chalayan, Erdem, Peter Pilotto, Jonathan Saunders, Mary Katrantzou, Roksanda Ilincic, Richard Nicoll, Roland Mouret, Eudon Choi & House of Holland.


The Vauxhall Fashion Scout Mentoring programme is designed to provide tailored advice to designers across all industry areas. We actively work to promote and develop both established and the next generation of talent to ensure that designers build sustainable and successful businesses. 

The VFS Mentoring programme is only possible due to the kind support of Beach Blanket Babylon and the Mayor of London.

Spaces are strictly limited to one representative per designer label.  
Priority is given to Vauxhall Fashion Scout designers.
RSVP essential to event@vauxhallfashionscout.com


Look forward to seeing you there!

VFS AW/12 Applications Closing Today




To request information and an application form please email Show@vauxhallfashionscout.com